The Best Parts of the Day

very reblog

smartgirlsattheparty:

thetrevorproject:

thetrevorproject:

It’s World Suicide Prevention Day and Trevor staff agrees: It’s brave to #AskForHelp today and every day.

Download your own sign for a selfie here. Then upload it using #AskForHelp!

Check out OktoAsk.org for more.

Have you taken a selfie yet? Download a sign at oktoask.org, then share your selfie with us during September’s National Suicide Prevention Month!

Also, here’s a list of International Suicide Hotlines for all you Smarties. 

“For most of life, nothing wonderful happens. If you don’t enjoy getting up and working and finishing your work and sitting down to a meal with family or friends, then the chances are that you’re not going to be very happy. If someone bases his happiness or unhappiness on major events like a great new job, huge amounts of money, a flawlessly happy marriage or a trip to Paris, that person isn’t going to be happy much of the time. If, on the other hand, happiness depends on a good breakfast, flowers in the yard, a drink or a nap, then we are more likely to live with quite a bit of happiness.”

—   Andy Rooney (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: simply-quotes, via marissa1982)

artbymoga:

lonestarmetalhead:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

There is a movie about that Thailand kick boxer.

There should be a movie about all of them

(via beterraba)

disability.gov - accessibility Resources & Information

gov-info:

We saw the windycitylibrarian’s question about classroom accommodations, and decided to answer it publicly, as creating “accessible environment” is not just the right thing to do, it’s the law. [A Gov Doc. ]

In a nutshell: There’s a Gov program devoted to all aspects of disability information and resources: disability.gov (creative name)

The site has both an “education” section [sample resource] and a technology” section [sample resource.] (reach by top toolbar.)

Most of the guides do not require “official” 508 status, but as you said, the student should register with disability services to guarantee a full range of accommodations* (more below). The site has excellent instructions about how to obtain it. 

Also, I thought the Veterans Administration might be a good resources,as (sadly) many vets have disabilities like your student’s. [va education page] Currently, I don’t see much information geared to this specific disability accommodation; but I have sent a email to the VA requesting it.

As to institutional avenues:

Cathy asked, are you at a school? All schools with federal funding must accommodate students/staff, if not have a formal Office of disability services. If not, or they’re not helpful, disability.gov links to state and local resources.

If a disability is a result of military action (even if not in combat), go to the va for benefits. The recent Obama initiative has increased funding and support for vet’s education (and jobs).

Hope this is helpful. We’ll post more information upon request.

*it will also help raise awareness & and increase services and funding.

cathylibrary:

windycitylibrarian:

Hey all,

I have a student who does not have use of the right hand, which makes computing particularly difficult. I guess I can switch the mouse around, but I have other students who use the lab and I don’t know if I’ll be able to consistently switch the controls over…

Does this student have an IEP or 504 on file? Check there, because there may already be accommodations in place.

If changing the mouse is too much, can the student use a laptop with a trackpad?

Is assigned seating an option, so if you do have to set up a computer, can you always set up the same one?

We have a study room set up with adaptive technology-most of it is software, but I can see what we have for hardware on Monday.

mildlyautisticsuperdetectives:

HERE IT IS. THIS IS IT. MY FAVORITE QUOTE FROM COMMUNITY. THIS ONE RIGHT HERE.

(Source: godyoutalkpretty, via beterraba)

thisisaadl:

Awesome middle school awkwardness! http://elitedaily.com/humor/fifth-graders-journal-entry-awkward-middle-school-years/755720/?utm_content=buffere2745&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Although many librarians may be understandably new to the topic of online surveillance, information professionals are not new to defending intellectual freedom and the right to read and voice dissenting opinions, as well as the rights of historically marginalized people who continue to be under the most surveillance.



Librarians are known for refusing requests from local law enforcement soliciting details on user browsing and borrowing records. The ALA has counted privacy among its core values since 1939, recognizing it as essential to free speech and intellectual freedom. And the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions is a signatory on the Thirteen International Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance. As Kade Crockford puts it, “Perhaps more than anyone in our society, librarians represent the values that make a democracy strong, intellectual freedom foremost among them.”

—   

Radical Librarianship: how ninja librarians are ensuring patrons’ electronic privacy

(via thecommonlibrarian)

I love being able to assure patrons at my library that we don’t keep record of the books they’ve read. Our checkout system will keep only three lists about you: the current materials you have out, the very last person to have checked out a book, and a list of all the items you’ve lost or damaged.

And you know what? All three vary and go away. The first clears when you turn in your books. The second clears when someone else checks them out or when we purge those items from our records. The third clears as soon as missing items are returned or damages paid for.

I love that. We value privacy so highly that if cops or other law groups asked us these things, we’d be simply unwilling but also unable to fulfill their requests.

(via drdandy)

(Source: thelifeguardlibrarian, via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

"No one will miss me", "I’m better off dead"

after-crisis:

When I worked at a non-profit that handled suicide prevention, I had access to the donation records. Each month, a specific man donated 15$ to our organization. It was like clockwork.. same day, same man, he had been doing this for over 4 years. It always seemed odd to me but I never questioned it… until I saw a note attached one month. "For Noah- Dad"

his donation was once his child’s allowance.

I can promise you, they would miss you for the rest of their lives.

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

thelifeguardlibrarian:

vintageanchorbooks:

HOW LONG IT TAKES TO READ THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR BOOKS: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/how-long-it-takes-to-read-the-worlds-most-popular-books

My brain likes this like this.

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

explainervideo:

The solar system in 1 gif!!!    more educational gifs«

explainervideo:

The solar system in 1 gif!!!    more educational gifs«

(via notyourstereotypicallibrarian)